Long-term effects of acid deposition on Virginia trout streams

Long-term effects of acid deposition on Virginia trout streams

Long-term effects of acid deposition on Virginia trout streams

swasSince 1979 the Shenandoah Watershed Study has been monitoring stream chemistry and flow at sites, such as White Oak Run (pictured at left with graduate student and field scientist Jeff Atkins), in the mountains of Virginia in order to evaluate the long-term effects of acid deposition and other ecological stressors on these systems. Monitoring efforts have demonstrated that streams in the mid-Appalachian mountains have been slow to respond to decreases in acid deposition, relative to other systems in the US and around the world. Recent analysis of the long-term data indicate that historical acid deposition produced long-lasting alterations to soil chemistry (e.g. increased adsorption of sulfate to, and the depletion of base cations from, highly weathered base-poor soils) which are responsible for the delayed recovery experienced by many streams in this region.  {More»}